Description: Description: Description: Description: C:\Users\suman\cbc\acbllogo.gifDescription: Description: Description: C:\Users\suman\Documents\CBC\head_new.gifDescription: Description: Description: Description: C:\Users\suman\cbc\acbllogo.gif


  Joyce's corner    News     Achievements      Calendar    Schedule   Lessons     Links     Partnership desk

 


Upcoming Events: NAP Qualifing

Read Midwest Monitor

District 11 Home page

COBA Home Page

Game Results
Mon-AM              Mon-EVE

Tue-AM               Tue-EVE

Wed-AM              Wed-EVE

Thu-AM               Thu-EVE

Fri-AM                 Fri-EVE

Sat-PM                 Sat-EVE

Sun-PM                Sun-EVE

 

Need a Partner?

call the Club at 459-9744
Need directions to our club? Click here!

CBC

Description: Description: Description: Description: C:\Users\suman\cbc\spacer.gif

North American Pairs (NAP) Qualifying Events

¨    Each summer, the ACBL sponsors club games to help you qualify for the  National Pairs Championship that is held at each spring NABC.  Club qualifiers, held during the months of June, July and August, will award ½ red and ½ black points at sectional rating.  The upper 50% of the field in each game wins the opportunity to compete in the District 11 final this fall, which is usually held in Cincinnati.  If you are a district winner part of your expenses to participate in the Philadelphia PA finals at the March 8 – 18, 2018, NABC will be subsidized by District 11. 

Unit 122 pays your $1.50 sanction fee for one session of each scheduled NAP qualifier, held by our club.  This is a generous subsidy from our Unit.  Targeted at encouraging you to compete in a nationally sponsored event, these games support the ACBL, award extra masterpoints, as well as, allow you to participate in good competitive fun.

 

                                Newcomers Game – Beginning June 14!

We all know them!  Players who love bridge, need bridge-experience, frequently play in homes and are a little shy about attending a duplicate game. Starting at 10:30 am each Wednesday morning, players having less than 50 master points (including none) are invited to Sam Hinkle’s bridge experience.

 

A knowledgeable, kind player himself, Sam helps many of his opponents tackle bridge questions, each time he plays. He plans to help all who participate in this game have lots of fun. He will be at the club each Wednesday by 10:00 am to answer questions, discuss bridge and prepare for their enjoyable game at 10:30 am.

 

Help us “spread the news” by inviting your bridge-playing friends to come enjoy a fun time any and all Wednesday mornings that they are available.

 

Slow Losers vs Fast Losers

 By Joyce Penn

   How many tricks do you expect to win if one suit that you hold is AKx, opposite three small cards in the dummy?  How many tricks to you expect to win if a suit that you hold is KQJ, opposite three small cards in the dummy (xxx)?

   In both cases, declarer can expect to win two tricks and lose one. This is where the similarity ends. In the first holding, declarer has a third round loser (slow) which gives declarer time to use another suit to discard that one loser.

   In the second holding, declarer has a first round (fast) loser. Declarer would need three discards from another suit to avoid that loser. Declarer cannot afford to lose any tricks in the process, since the loser in the second holding can immediately be grabbed by the defense. It is useful, when declaring, to notice if your losers are fast or slow. When planning the play of a hand, slow losers can be used to your advantage: search other side suits for ways to discard those losers.

   A “mirror” distribution refers to the holding where both declarer and dummy have the same length in all four suits. No matter how many high card points are held, declarer may have limited trick taking ability since no suit can provide discards for slow losers.

 

A Guide to The Limited Games at the Bridge Center

  

   Each Monday and Friday morning, we hold a limited pairs section beside our Open Pairs section, at 11:30 am. Masterpoints awarded are 80% of those in the open game and allow you to compete against other limited pairs. The maximum award is 1.20 masterpoints for a limited game. On Monday, you, or your partner, may not have more than 750 MPs and on Friday, players with up to 1,000 MPs may play in this section.

   Each Tuesday and Thursday morning, we hold a handicap open pairs game, in which players with limited masterpoints are given a board handicap, based on their existing masterpoints. Handicap categories begin with the 0-5 masterpoint players, progressing through 5-20 MPs, 20-50 MPs and all the way to 2,000 MPs, at which point, no handicap is given. Masterpoint awards are “split” for these games. There are two categories of winners, raw and handicap. First place in the handicap field is 50 percent of what it would normally be, but players who place in both fields, receive a combination of scores. No negative handicaps are permitted.

    Circle your difficult hands each Tuesday and join Joyce, at 3:15 pm, for a discussion of the bidding, play and/or defense, of those tough boards. If a convention is involved, in the bidding, Joyce will review it and consider alternative treatments. She discusses leads and declarer play, to help you improve, from week to week. Each Thursday morning, at 10:15, join Cheryl for regular instruction and hand analysis. Bring your problem hands to discuss and learn Cheryl’s solutions as she discusses each hand, and topic. There is no charge for these sessions.

 

 JOYCE’S TIPS:

Passive Defense = “safe.” Leading from three low cards or the top of a sequence. This type of defense is usually indicated unless you see a runnable side-suit in dummy and suspect declarer can throw his losers away.

Aggressive Defense = “attacking.” It is designed to capture tricks quickly, such as leading away from a king or laying down an unsupported ace. Suppose you decide to attack a suit holding K J 2. Which card should you lead? Lead the 2, hoping your partner has the Ace and can come back through declarer, trapping his Q with your K and J. Try to be passive, unless the evidence indicates that declarer can dispose of losers, unless you do become active.

 

1. The common phrase, “Eight Ever-Nine Never,” refers only to the missing Queen of trump. Therefore, if you are declaring a hand with 8 trumps between you and the dummy, it is probably correct to finesse for the Queen (“ever”). If you are declaring a hand with 9 trumps between you and the dummy, it is probably correct to NOT finesse for the Queen (“never”). That is, with no extraneous information from the bidding, play the Ace of trump, followed by the King of trump, hoping that the Queen falls. 2. An opening lead of a singleton is seldom correct – especially if your partner has never bid. Why? He’s not getting in to give you the ruff you want so badly!